(no subject)

Jun. 28th, 2017 10:04 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Had some further thoughts about tricking 1-categories into saying things about n-categories. Got as far as a definition, ran out of steam trying to turn the crank on what consequences it has.
blk: (Default)
[personal profile] blk
I've recently decided that I like listening to stuff when I'm walking/biking/driving. And since a) I don't pay to subscribe to any music streaming services (nor is my private collection very impressive), and b) the speakers in my car are so crappy that playing almost any kind of music on it is an insult to the music, I've been listening to podcasts.

I had gone without listening to things for so long that I had a couple years of backlog of Wait Wait Don't Tell Me to catch up on, which kept me golden for a while, but then I ran out, and started seeking more. I feel like I've struck out way more than I've hit gold, so this post is mostly here to ask for suggestions.

What I like: humor, storytelling, brevity, segments I can start and finish in a typical day's commute (~20-25 minutes one way), nothing too deep as my attention isn't 100% on it at any point and my listening is the first things to go if my brain is preoccupied.

What I don't like: People having a lengthy, unedited conversation. Too much pop culture references that doesn't include me. The wrong kind of humor.

What I've tried:

Wait Wait Don't Tell Me
My favorite podcast that I've listened to for many many years and compare all others to. I like the personalities, I like the humor, I like that it is strictly edited and consistently timed, I like that no single segment in it is very long (even Not My Job is rarely more than 10-15 minutes).

The Moth
My next favorite. The stories are captivating and interesting and emotional and not too long. Just right for a small listening break in my day. The character list is ever changing, but they are basically all people who are picked for being good at storytelling, which is important. If I needed to I could probably just go back into the archives and listen to all of them.

This American Life
Pretty good show by those hipster know-it-alls who talk about how fascinating ordinary people are. I like when humans are shown in detail and made to be complex and sympathetic and Ira Glass does a good job at that. I remember listening to it years ago in the car when I'd flip to NPR and it would be on by chance, and generally enjoyed it then, so I looked it up now. Not much has changed, but it's all new.

Hello Internet
This one breaks all my rules for what I think I should like and yet I kinda do. My older son introduced me to it as something he enjoyed, and we got through a couple episodes on a college commute trip. It is, basically, just two dudes chatting, which I would expect to be bored by, and yet somehow I'm not. I suspect it has to do with the fact that hosts CGP Gray and Brady Haran are both successful YouTubers, and know the art of editing. But I also appreciate that the two of them, even though they seem to have very different personalities with occasionally wildly opposing opinions, obviously get along very well, and their comfort with each other somehow comes across in their shows.

The Ezra Klein Show
I started this because I've read a lot of Ezra Klein interviews and articles that I've liked. I admire his brain and his interviews tend to be with people who are passionate and articulate in ways I want to hear more of. But the interviews are on the long side, and I always find my brain wandering a little. I would probably appreciate these interviews a lot more by spending 10 minutes reading them than an hour listening to them.

Welcome to Night Vale
The premise sounded really good to me, a lot of my friends are in love with it, and I enjoyed it some. I listened to the first 10 episodes to really try to get into it, and while it has some nifty bits, it's just not as appealing to me as I'd hoped. It's non-contiguous enough that while I realize I don't -have- to listen to them all in order, it throws in a few ongoing storylines here and there so that skipping around doesn't seem to make sense. On the upside, each episode is fairly short, so I may go back and try more eventually.

No Dumb Questions
Downloaded because I like Destin Sandlin's work on Smarter Every Day. Unfortunately the one ep I listened to was basically a really long conversation between three people, probably only about 25% of which I found particularly interesting. On the upside, I discovered Emily Graslie and The Brain Scoop, which is vaguely interesting, but I don't think the rest is worthwhile to do it again.

Dear Hank and John
I like the Vlog brothers's personalities and most of their videos that I've seen. And I liked Paper Towns. Unfortunately, like John's books, this show is really aimed towards a much younger audience than me, and although I gave it a few episodes, I found their focus on answering internet questions to be pretty irrelevant to me.

The Daily Show Podcast Without John Stewart
I love the Daily Show, I like the correspondents, I like the editing. This was fun. But there were only 20 episodes, and then it stopped.

Stuff You Should Know
I downloaded this one because it was rated highly and is hosted by writers at HowStuffWorks, which sounded interesting. But it's basically another hour of two people having a conversation and usually not about things that I cared about (or agreed with).

2 Dope Queens
I like both Jessica Williams and Phoebe Robinson and yet their conversations and joking around just didn't amuse me.

My Brother, My Brother, and Me
Answering inane questions from random listeners or Yahoo (bzzt). An hour of conversation between people I don't know and don't particularly find funny (bzzt). Not going back here.


So, dear Readers. Given these descriptions (or not), what podcasts do you like and you would recommend to me? Heck, I'm even interested in some that feature music, as my headphones are pretty decent.

(no subject)

Jun. 25th, 2017 09:16 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Tried to go to studio square with K and her parents, but it turned out to be closed. Tried bohemian beer garden instead, got a big ol' meat variety platter, weather was nice, had a good time.

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 03:06 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Some suprising subtlety about constant functions in HoTT: http://hott-uf.gforge.inria.fr/2015/HOTTUF_Martin.pdf

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 12:48 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Here's a little category-theoretic fact I only learned from reading
around in nlab just now but wish I had years ago:

The condition that characterizes a relation R being a
functional relation is that R is left adjoint to Rop!

I find it stunningly lovely how adjoints appear so deep down in the
most basic definitions --- one you'd encounter in
like day 1 of the standard bedtime story of how all of math
is built up from set theory.

Let's unpack it. Let a relation R : A ↔ B be given. The
triangle-equalities way of saying "R ⊣ Rop" is that there exist

η : 1A → Rop ∘ R
ε : R ∘ Rop → 1B

What's η telling us? For every a ∈ A, there's some b that's the
intermediate-hop witness to (a, a) ∈ Rop ∘ R, but that just means it's
a b such that (a, b) ∈ R and, well, (b, a) ∈ Rop, which is the same
thing. Oh, so R is total; it relates every a to at least one b.

What's ε telling us? For every (b, b') ∈ R ∘ Rop, (b, b') ∈
1B, hence b = b'. But when's (b, b')? Whenever there's an a
such that (b', a) ∈ Rop and (a, b) ∈ R. But that's the same as R
relating a to both b and b'. So ε is just telling us that whenever
a is related to both b and b', they must be equal. R is a partial function!

Hence η and ε together tell us R is a total function.

(no subject)

Jun. 23rd, 2017 08:36 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
So Nuyt has this notion of "bridge", a relation between elements of any type, kind of like paths in the HoTT sense --- except weaker, and weaker even than a notion of directed path. If we call the inhabitants of standard HoTT equality types "symmetric paths", then the kind of univalencey things we apparently expect to happen are
a symmetric path from type A to type Ban equivalence of types A and B
a directed path from type A to type Ba function from A to B
a bridge from type A to type Ba relation on A and B

and anyway it is a peculiarly fascinating notion and seems like it ought to be involved with clarifying what relational parametricity has to do with HoTT.

Also, like, what's the general theory of what concepts can be "univalenced-up" out of data that apply to types generally, (i.e. the first column of the above table) but are magically correlated with useful constructions on types (the second column)?

(no subject)

Jun. 22nd, 2017 08:35 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Trying to grok Nuyts's thesis again.

"Spring semester" in review

Jun. 22nd, 2017 10:30 pm
winterkoninkje: shadowcrane (clean) (Default)
[personal profile] winterkoninkje

Hi all, long time no post. A lot has been going on, but I’m finally starting to get on top of things again. I’ve been meaning to write in a bit more depth about some of this, but that want for perfection has been the enemy of the writing anything at all. So, here’s a quick synopsis of what’s been going on in my neck of the woods.

Both of L’s parents passed away. We’ve known this was coming, but it’s still hard of course. L was out there for a bit over a month taking care of her mom. They died very close together, so we ended up having a single combined service. I was out there for about a week helping to wrap things up before whisking L back home.

I finally got back the results of the genetics test. Turns out I don’t have Loeys–Dietz, or at least not the same genetic variant my mother did. But I definitely have something. So it’s back to the diagnostic swamp trying to figure out how to give it a name so that doctors’ll take it seriously. Current working hypothesis is hypermobility-type Ehlers–Danlos. Alas, “hypermobility-type” is medical jargon for “we have no idea what this is, but it kinda looks similar to the forms of Ehlers–Danlos we do know stuff about, so let’s call it that.” So, yeah, no medical tests to “prove” that’s what it is; just your usual game of convincing folks you have enough of the symptoms to match the syndrome.

I’ve been getting used to paying attention to my ADHD and working with it rather than trying to plow through it. It helps a lot to recognize that it’s not a failing on my part (e.g., that I can’t focus on boring things for as long as other people) but rather just part of how I’m wired. That makes it a lot easier to stop beating myself up over things, and instead figure out better ways to work with my brain rather than trying to force it into a shape it won’t take. As I’ve gotten better at this I’ve finally started getting caught up on a bunch of things that’ve fallen to the wayside over the past few years.

For example, I’m slowly getting caught up on the backlog of bug reports and feature requests for my various Haskell packages. Mostly been focusing on logfloat and unification-fd so far, but will make it around to the others in time. So, if you sent me an email about some bug or feature over the past few years and it seems to have fallen into the void, consider filing a ticket.

Still working on getting caught up to where I should be on my dissertation.

Work has also been going excellently. It’s all seekrit and nonsense, so I can’t say too much about it. But lately I’ve been doing a bunch of work on characterizing families of mathematical objects, and discovering their symmetries so we can exploit them to simplify and optimize things. So lots of mathy goodness going on. It’s a bit more geometric and combinatorial than my usual algebraic fare, but it’s the sort of stuff that arises from algebraic structures so it’s not too far from home base. (If that doesn’t make sense to you, maybe take a look at Brent Yorgey’s thesis to see an example of the connection between combinatorics and algebraic data types.) Plus, it helps that I’ve been getting to know some of the hella queer ladies who work in my building :)

In other health-y news, round about the time I got officially diagnosed with ADHD I had a bunch of friends going on about what the symptoms of allism (aka non-autism) are. Though I have a bunch of autistic friends, I’ve never really known much about what autism’s really like because all the literature is written by allistic folks, for allistic folks, so they’re all “patient has underdeveloped/insufficient blah” and I’m like “according to what baseline? How much blah does it take to count as having ‘sufficient’ blah? What are diagnostic details for measuring how much blah you really have?” So I finally got to hear some details from the autistic side of the fence, where people actually explain shit and elucidate the differences. And based on that: I’m hella not allistic. I can (and should! and have been meaning to!) write a whole separate post on this topic. I’m still not entirely sure I feel comfortable adopting “autistic” label (for reasons which are, themselves, further symptoms of autism), because my experiences don’t match up perfectly with some of the parts of what is traditionally called “autism”, but I’m absolutely non-allistic. I think the spectrum of non-allism is far larger and more diverse than allistic people currently believe, but —again— a post for another time.

(no subject)

Jun. 21st, 2017 09:49 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Sally came out to astoria so we hung out a bit. Banh mi at district saigon was amaaaaazing. Cracked open the MELL-is-decidable paper from 2015 that a Mysterious Academic Friend With Connections sent me, but haven't digested it yet.

Fads of youth

Jun. 21st, 2017 09:25 am
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
I was thinking last night of fads. In the 70s I had an official "Pet Rock" which I loved. The manual on care and training of Pet Rocks was very amusingly written (at least to my 7 year old mind). Pet Rocks were particularly great at learning to "stay" and "play dead". It came in a little carton full of straw with the manual and I think, a leash.

My dad was a good model for how to gently enjoy human absurdity and I remember him being super entertained by the pet rock and playing along with it super well.

my political sentimentality

Jun. 20th, 2017 11:50 am
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
From "An Excerpt From My Definitely Not a Presidential Campaign Book" by Alexandra Petri, Washington Post, June 5, 2017:


People always ask me what I'm passionate about, and I tell them the following story: When I was a little kid, my grandmother took me to see an injustice. I got so mad! I threw my red white and blue popsicle down on the ground. My grandmother picked it up and said, "Winner, these colors are sacred. Never let them drop." And I said, "I know, Grandma, but I don't like to see injustice!" and she said, "That's just the world we live in. Unless you grow up and devise common-sense policy solutions to do something about it. And don't forget the men who died to give that right to you, and proudly stand up to defend her still today."

....

I think sex is bad unless it falls into one of the five categories below that also conveniently align with my policy proposals:

-- you are thinking about tax reform during it
-- other people are having it and you are vocally disapproving of it
-- at least one of the people involved is committed to being a great dad
-- it involves one willing participant who is a male celebrity
-- it is binding Americans together and serving to restore our common values


So one way I know that I am hopelessly sentimental about civic virtue and so on, and that part of me is an utter sucker for "common-sense policy solutions"/"binding Americans together"-type rhetoric, is that even this parody makes me mist up a little bit. Also I have literally cried (albeit on an airplane) at a Doritos ad that championed bipartisanship.

(As a young'un I came across a copy of Art Buchwald's I Never Danced at the White House and read it and thus learned about Watergate. Art Buchwald was a political humor columnist for the Washington Post. I am imagining some twelve-year-old girl in 2039 reading a Petri collection, getting about 30% of the jokes and enjoying it a lot.)

(Also I should look up whether there is critical scholarship discussing Alexandra Petri, Alexandra Erin, the Toast work of Mallory Ortberg, and whoever else is doing .... this kind of thing in this era. *handwave*)

(no subject)

Jun. 19th, 2017 06:39 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Hot today, thunderstorms. Giving the math a break and switching back to working on a dumb react toy.

Heat regulation

Jun. 18th, 2017 07:36 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
First super super hot day here. If tomorrow will be like this I need to find the fan in the garage.

I just shaved about a pound of side hair off (it is thick) and have put it in the worm bin. Good compost aeration! And, felt happy I had cleaned and organized the closet weeks ago as I easily found my little box of house dresses.

I'm wearing this amazing reversible soft linen sleeveless dress, with a pocket for my handkerchief, that I got from Flax on skud's recommendation a few years ago (converting me fervently to linen) And my hair has been up in a top of the head ponytail all day (now much more effective with the side hair shaved off.) I think of skud affectionately whenever I wear this amazing dress (maroon on one side and lavender on the other). The pocket handkerchief is daintily printed with violets. I ironed it the other day, as I enjoy doing.

Now you know everything. All my secrets. Dresses, ironing, and the fact that I have that chicken yodeling song stuck in my head.

Experimental notebook transfer

Jun. 18th, 2017 01:40 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
So out of the habit of blogging. The back injection was harder to take this time than usual (I think) Thursday is very fuzzy - I barely remember it after I got home. Dossie brought me to the pain clinic and I do remember them giving me an extra dose of whatever it was into the vein, as I was cussing and had trouble staying still for the needle. The clinic is trying a new thing where they play you music on request during a procedure so I asked for Bach. How do you spell it? Nurse very puzzled. Then the one thing I remember other than Dr. Pham telling the resident, You have no idea what is about to happen here and me laughing and then cussing my head off. In the middle of it as I got calm, exclaiming, "Oh, Brandenburg Concerto number 3" and feeling clever to have any brain cells at all.

I can't actually remember getting in the car or getting home at all but I believe Dossie must have got here and then Milo was here as well so.... ?

Not sure if it is worth it. Some times I feel better immediately but this time I have been in an annoying (semi incapacitating) level of pain at the injection sites from Thursday to Saturday. I had to skip a nice board game birthday party and a punk rock history movie. Very quiet weekend alone. Rosa came over for tea and to pick up some things - I haven't seen her in a while. I am somewhat functional but in small bits and without bending over much. The quiet weekend has meant I am more than caught up on tidying up after myself and other people. When that happens I can make inroads on the accumulated disorder. We need to get rid of some books. Also, I think the anesthetic and sedative and steroids together made me feel strange, brainless, aimless, exhausted.

Today has been better. I went up the hill to Pinhole cafe and went through some bits of 3 different notebooks. I tried to copy any worthwhile bits out of the big black moleskine one from December into the 2 new ones, especially working on the Andromeda and Venus poems. I am fairly happy with the first bit, have lots of the 2nd, some of the 3rd but it is not quite coalesced and something to #4. Nothing on 5 (Maybe?) But the structure is more clear to me. I wrote some new snippets and copied over other parts. Found the notes I took in my lap at the actual dance performance that it's about.

Horrors when I was on my way to Dossie's office Tues. evening and realized there was NO NOTEBOOKS WTF. I got a substandard one in the walgreens (nothing else open) So here is my entry from it before I tear out the pages and pass the unsuitable notebook on. (I am too fussy, but I don't like a yucky feeling cover, or a size too small with binding too tight, as I can't think on paper well without wider space)

>>> Lovely jcab driver named Yosief from Eritrea a poet who used to write for the newspapers. We talked about the route and the pleasure of driving around to random places following where someone else wants to go (better than seeing nothing in a 7-11 as he was at first and no one would talk with him) It is other people's choices. We admired Glen Park Canyon as we drove up the street alongside.

His family's place in Eritrea is very beautiful with trees with fruit of all kinds, grapes, plums, and their neighbor had cows so they would trade for milk. The family thought of expanding the house but it would have meant cutting down some of the fruit trees so they had a big family meeting and decided not to. He feels like trees with fruit almost have a soul. You have to respect them. I added you feel connected to the land when you eat something you know comes right from it that you grew and picked.

He described how Trump is just like the dictator in Eritrea , how they fought for independence but then got a dictator for 26 years no better than before. America is supposed to be for disagreeing and discussing anything you want without hate. He has a picture he cut out from the paper of Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner kissing each other on the cheek and shaking hands which he framed and put on the wall as it is the spirit of America that they completely disagree but can at least act friendly. But now maybe things are going bad and we can't think that we are immune from society falling apart. It can happen here, and the rich and greedy are the same everywhere, they only want power and they don't care what happens otherwise. He has to call up his family and tell them everything about politics, and they try to protect him by telling him it will be OK... because they know he's sensitive.

In case you can't tell this was all completely charming and I told him how I am also a poet and translator and about Carmen's book and said we should email and send poems. I went to write down my email and realized NO NOTEBOOK and not a scrap of paper on me. This never happens! How embarrassing just when I claimed to be a writer! He put his email into my phone but then i accidentally thought i lost it when I closed the email app. But! Found it! Now, he wonders if I will help him translate a poem? I may do this (counting on no misunderstanding about a meetup)

>>>
My plan was to hang out in pt. reyes town and write and work on poems while D. was at her appointment but no notebook. I can likely buy a decent one there in the bookstore.

Middle section of poem cycle as visual play across page with form? In a cleft or split going vertically for the structural supports. Too much? Or better have it underpin every page or some pages running through the whole thing as the supports should be 100% visible. Rodin's anatomical studies for those guys in the village (aldermen?). So, either that or 3rd section would be ramp/cleft/structure and 4th would be naiads.

Thinking of the free play across the page that I admire. The comical woman crossing the atlantic communist poem, Elvira H. Carta de viaje - more free and far-ranging. That space & far-ranging wide freedom has to underpin the entire Descent cycle. Consider also American Air (together with carta de viaje, atlantic, ibarbourou atlantic poems, in its own little book?)

Note, add Florentino book to ebook list for Burn This Press. Nearly forgot it.

>>>
Punchline of this is that a day later I found one of the 3 notebooks at the very bottom of my big backpack. So was able to work after all, with notes.

drifting fires of orange flowers

Jun. 18th, 2017 01:41 pm
blk: (Default)
[personal profile] blk
First ripe raspberry of the year was today, June 18, one day later than last year.

May flowers were purple and pink. The last week of May and the first week of June I have almost no flowers. Then starting in June I have orange and yellow from the daylilies and coreopsis. There's been a ton of rain lately which the gardens have loved. The weeds have also loved it, too. Yesterday I weeded some places that had gotten a little out of hand, including the painted sidewalk. I'd thought that the paver base and sand was supposed to keep stuff from growing there, but I guess some weeds don't need much.

I planted some chard plants late and just transplanted some teeny squash plants from the compost. They've gotten a late start but are still alive. I'll see if they're still around next month.

Orange lilies half blooming.

(no subject)

Jun. 17th, 2017 08:07 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Today have been thinking about the internal definition of Grothendieck universes. Seems reasonable to me to try to impose univalence by demanding a unique name for each nameable indexed family? In which case you get a nice lemma that any two such univalent universes with the same set of nameable morphisms are isomorphic in a suitable sense.

(no subject)

Jun. 16th, 2017 08:50 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
I wonder if there's a nice way to unify
(a) the idea that if you write a pure program over no particular monad, with no particular effects, then you should be able to use it in --- that is, canonically lift it into --- an otherwise monadic/effectful context
(b) the idea that internalizing parametricity in a logical framework feels like the ability to take a construction valid in a category C and hoisting it up to the category CJ where J can be, for example, the "free-living span" category * ⇐ * ⇒ *, in which case you get relational parametricity for a binary relation.

In both cases, it seems like you write a program "parametric over" the ambient category you're doing programming in, relying only on the fact that it's CCC, has initial algebras for whatever datatypes you need, etc. etc., and you could then instantiate it at other categories --- like the kleisli category for the monad you're interested in in (a), or the category CJ for (b), as long as those other categories support the same constructs you need to write your programs with.

music in Steven Universe

Jun. 16th, 2017 02:54 pm
brainwane: My smiling face in front of a brick wall, May 2015. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
Post-WisCon, I have a new hairdo (a pretty butch sort of fauxhawk) and my spouse and I have started watching Steven Universe. We're around the beginning of Season 3 I think which means we just saw the episode that had the duet-with-piano "Do It For Her". Is it just me or is that the song (so far) that sounds most like it could fit into a Broadway show? Like, change the words a little and it could go into Wicked?

(Also the theme tune just switched to a new arrangement and I am still getting used to this.)

(no subject)

Jun. 15th, 2017 01:41 pm
jcreed: (Default)
[personal profile] jcreed
Reading some more papers on dependent types and parametricity.

little kids: kind of a big fan

Jun. 16th, 2017 12:09 am
[personal profile] alexr_rwx
One thing I'm pumped about is small children. This is especially salient, because, y'know, we're going to have one on hand soon.

Two interesting interactions with small children recently.

- We went to go look at a daycare today, for, y'know, our upcoming small child. And the daycare looks like a super nice situation for small children; really chill, with tiny little chairs for them to sit on (once they can sit up!), and for kids who go to the day care for a long time, they stick with the same kids and the same teachers for as long as they're there.

So we're checking out the area for the youngest kids, and a tiny little child come crawling over to me, super interested. I crouch down and look at the kid, and they offer their tiny little hands in a very clear "please hold my hands" gesture. So I hold up my two hands, index fingers up, and the kid hefts themselves up from a crawl to standing!

This looked like a person very new to standing (even with assistance), but they handled it like a champ!

- This past Sunday, I was getting some shoes at SportsTowne Shoe Center. And I'm sitting there, trying some on. And this tiny little boy, maybe 3 years old, is climbing all over the shoe-area furniture. It's extremely adorable.

His dad was there, but this little boy looks right at me, and he's got this little ball, like a mock rubber baseball, and he gestures that he's going to toss it to me.

So he does! And I'm in a sporting goods store, playing catch with a stranger's three year old :3 He was so friendly and fearless. Just goes up to a random stranger who doesn't look like his family (they might have been... Filipino, if I had to guess?) and immediately makes friends and starts playing catch. Except that he really couldn't catch the ball yet, because small child! But he was all over trying to do it!

That's the kind of interaction I want to have with people.
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